Omair Zubairi, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

omair zubairi
Phone: 

Ph.D. Computational Science, Claremont Graduate University JDP San Diego State University (2015)

M.S. Physics, San Diego State University (2010)

B.S. Physics, San Diego State University (2007)

Dr. Zubairi, Assistant professor of physics joined the Department of Sciences in Fall 2015.  Since then, he has taught a variety of courses to include conceptual physics, the algebra and calculus based freshman series and introduction to astronomy. He has also taught the upper division modern physics course which includes topics ranging from special relativity to quantum and nuclear physics.  Dr. Zubairi has also developed a brand new upper division elective course on computational physics which focuses on a wide range of physics topics such as classical mechanics, electricity & magnetism, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, and astrophysics.

Dr. Zubairi constructed Wentworth’s first high performance super computer from funding he was awarded from WIT EPIC Mini-Grant program.  The super computer named "Arioch" is primarily used for research and course development for faculty and students across campus.

Dr. Zubairi’s research interests lies in the areas of numerical astrophysics and general relativity, in particular, theoretical and computational modeling of compact stars such as quark and neutron stars.  His other interests include mathematical modeling, computational methods & techniques, and high performance computing.

Courses for the 2018/19 academic year:

Spring 2019:

  • PHYS 1750: Engineering Physics II (E&M)
  • PHYS 2990: Directed Undergraduate Research
  • PHYS 3100: Modern Physics

Summer 2019:

  • COMP 3450: Parallel and Distributed Computing
  • PHYS 1250: Engineering Physics I (Mechanics)

I am a theoretical and computational physicist working in the areas of general relativity and numerical astrophysics. In particular, I study the physics of compact stars such as quark/neutron stars. My work involves computational modeling of these compact stars in the framework of general relativity by studying the stellar structure, interior composition and thermal evolution of these stellar objects.

Currently I am working on stellar structure models of highly magnetized compact objects such as Magnetars and/or neutron stars which may contain color superconducting quark matter cores in the framework of general relativity.  If you are interested in computing and astrophysics, come talk to me, I have a projects which you can work on!

Mass-Radius plots for highly magnetized deformed neutron stars (Centennial of General Relativity; A Celebration, World Scientific Publishing, 2017) using various different models for the equation of state (eos).  Neutron star masses can either increase or decrease depending on the type of deformation--Oblate or Prolate, respectively.

A 3D simulation of deformed compact objects using the MIT bag model equation of state.  These objects are deformed by 20 % in the equatorial (left) or in the polar (right) direction.  The maximum mass for these objects is 2.67 solar masses (left) and 1.57 solar masses (right) which is significantly different than from the spherical case of 2.01 solar masses (zubairi et al, 2017).

Recent Publications:

  • O. Zubairi, P. Kottering, and F. Weber, "Numerical Simulations on Highly Magnetized White Dwarfs," IN PREPARATION.
  • O. Zubairi, R. Maresca, and F. Weber, "The Stellar Structure of Deformed Non-Rotating Neutron Stars: A Brief Review," IN PREPARATION.
  • O. Zubairi and F. Weber, J. Mod. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 1239, 012007, (2019).
  • O. Zubairi, D. Wigley, and F. Weber, Int. J. Mod. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 45, 1760029, (2017).
  • O. Zubairi and F. Weber, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser., 845, 012005, (2017).
  • O. Zubairi, W. Spinella, A. Romero, R. Millinger, F. Weber, M. Orsaria, and G. Contrera, arXiv:1504.03006v1 [astro-ph.SR], (2015).
  • O. Zubairi, A. Romero, and F. Weber, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser.:, 615, 012003, (2015).
  • F. Weber, G. Contrera, M .Orsaria, W. Spinella, and O. Zubairi, Mod. Phys. Lett. A, 29, No. 23, (2014).
  • O. Zubairi, and F. Weber, Astron. Nachr, 335, 593-598, (2014).

Textbooks & Contributed Book Chapters:

  • O. Zubairi and F. Weber, “Introduction to Computational Physics for Undergraduates”, Morgan & Claypool Publishers, 2018
  • O. Zubairi and F. Weber, “Non-spherical Compact Stellar Objects in Einstein’s Theory in General Relativity”, In: Centennial of General Relativity; A Celebration, World Scientific Publishing, 2017

Current Research Group:

Ryan Maresca (December 2017-Present)
B.S. Applied Math, Class of 2020
Wentworth Institute of Technology
Research Project Title: Computational Modeling of the Gravitational Mass Quadrupole Moment of Deformed Compact Stellar Objects

Megi Baliko & Deanna Kondek (March 2017-Present)
B.S. Civil Engineering, Class of 2019
Wentworth Institute of Technology
Research Project Title: Dark Matter Compact Stars in an Accelerating Universe

David Wigley (May 2016-Present)
B.S. Computer Engineering, Class of 2019
Wentworth Institute of Technology
Research Project Title: Numerical Simulations of Non-Spherical Compact Stars

Per Semester Research Projects Supervised:

Rj Findley (Fall 2018)
B.S. Electrical Engineering, Class of 2020
Wentworth Institute of Technology
Research Project Title: Dark Matter Compact Stars

TJ Mattos (Summer 2017)
B.S. Applied Math, Class of 2019
Wentworth Institute of Technology
Research Project Title: Numerical Simulations of Exo-Planets

Greg Shao (Summer 2017)
B.S. Computer Science, Class of 2017
Wentworth Institute of Technology
Research Project Title: Neutron Stars as a Source of Gravitational Waves

Scott Moir (Spring 2017)
B.S. Electrical Engineering, Class of 2017
Wentworth Institute of Technology
Research Project Title: Numerically Computed Trans-Lunar Injection Model

Temour Raza  (Fall 2016)
B.S. Electrical Engineering, Class of 2019
Wentworth Institute of Technology
Research Project Title: Computational Modeling of Ion Paul Traps

Recent Seminars:

  • Compact Stars in the QCD Phase Diagram (CSQCD), New York: June 2018, "The Role of Deformation on the Stellar Structure of Non-Rotating Neutron Stars"
  • International Association of Relativistic Dynamics (IARD), Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, June 2018, "Significance of Deformity on the Mass Quadrupole Moment of Non-Rotating Neutron Stars"
  • American Physical Society (APS), Columbus, OH:  April 2018, "Consequences of Axial Symmetry on Compact Stellar Objects"
  • International Workshop on Astronomy & Relativistic Astrophysics (IWARA), Gramado, Brazil: Oct. 2016: “Stellar Structure Models Deformed Neutron Stars

Distinctions:

  • Presidents Award for Distinguished Scholarship
    Wentworth Institute of Technology, May 2018

Funding & Grants:

Wentworth Institute of Technology (Nov. 2016)
Presidential EPIC Mini Grant: Beating Earnshaw’s Theorem

Principle Investigator: Dr. Douglas Goodman
Co-PI: Dr. Omair Zubairi
Amount Awarded: $5, 000.00

Institute grant for the construction of an electrodynamic ion trap which is capable of confining multiple charged dust particles.  The apparatus is used for research in both experimental and computational physics.

Wentworth Institute of Technology (Feb. 2016)
Presidential EPIC Mini Grant: Applications in Computational Science

Principle Investigator: Dr. Omair Zubairi
Amount Awarded: $5, 000.00

Institute grant for the construction of a super computer for research and course development for faculty and students across campus.

Students and Professor Constructing a Super Computer

Dr. Omair Zubairi and interdisciplinary students from the Computer Science, Electromechanical Engineering, Applied Math, and Computer Engineering departments are constructing WIT's First high performance computer.

In this picture, the motherboard of the system is shown. Electromechanical Engineering student Nick Piscitello is adding ram into the sockets while Computer Engineering student Jd. Martin is holding up one of the two processors to be attached next. Once the processors are attached to the motherboard, Jd. Martin carefully applied a thermal paste before attaching the heat sink fans. This is a crucial step in the process as we do not want the processors to over heat.

Invited Talks:

  • Department of Physics & Astronomy, Wheaton College, Nov. 2017, "Stellar Structure Models of Highly Magnetized Neutron Stars"
  • Department of Physics, Trinity College, Feb. 2017, "Implications of Deformation on the Stellar Structure of Neutron Stars"