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2017-2018 Academic Catalog: Course Descriptions - Sociology

SOCL 1051 SOCIOLOGY (CPCE)
This course is an introduction to sociology, the systematic study of human groups and social relations. We will analyze the basic structure of society and the issues confronting contemporary life in America. Special emphasis will be placed upon the problems and concerns that bring about change in modern society. (3 credits)
Prerequisite: ENGL1050

SOCL 2990 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SOCIOLOGY
This course investigates a topic of special interest to faculty and students that is outside existing course offerings. (4 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of an ENGL sequence

SOCL 3800 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY
These courses present topics that are not covered by existing courses and are likely to change from semester to semester. Refer to the semester schedule for the courses offered that semester.  Contact the faculty assigned for more information about the course topic. (4 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of an ENGL sequence

SOCL 4102 SOCIOLOGY
This course explores sociology, the systematic study of groups and social relations. Sociology investigates the intersection of biography and history by relating the life of the individual to the operation of social institutions; how a person's life interacts with the collective experience of others. We will analyze the basic structure of society and the issues confronting contemporary life in America. Special emphasis will be placed upon forces and problems that bring about cultural change in American society today. In addition, we shall broaden our perspectives to include issues of globalization. (4 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of an ENGL sequence

SOCL 4202 SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
This course will focus on group behavior which occurs outside established institutions. It considers behavior which occurs in spontaneous and structured situations. The main theme of the course is to study social movements aimed at transforming society. (4 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of an ENGL sequence

SOCL 4332 SOCIAL PROBLEMS
What is a social problem?  How does a particular social phenomenon become defined as a social problem?  These are the types of questions that this course will begin to answer.  This course will provide an analysis of some of the most significant social problems in the United States, and other nations, including: poverty, homelessness, racisms, segregation, heal, and environmental destruction.  We will examine the social and structural factors associated with the creation of these and other problems as well as ways to address and overcome them.  We will pay particular attention to how issues become defined as social problems, who gets to define them, and the implications that these problems have for society and its members.  Using a sociological perspective, we will delve deeper into these issues to gain a better understanding of their causes and possible solutions and how people experience and make sense of these issues.  By the end of the course, you should come away with a better understanding of what constitutes a social problem and possible ways of addressing and solving them. (4 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of an ENGL sequence

SOCL 4432 MARRIAGE AND FAMILY
This course explores marriage and families from a sociological perspective.  The goal of Sociology, as a social science, is to better understand social institutions through the use of empirical research.  In this course we will examine current and historical patterns in family formation, theoretical perspectives on family processes, how social policy shapes and influences family life, and the role of family in contemporary American society.  Using readings, films, and class discussions, we will explore a myriad of issues related to family life including: gender, parenting, adoption, divorce, family diversity, family violence, and more.  Finally, we will examine the social construction of family and explore how cultural contexts and social forces help shape our ideas and beliefs about what family should be and how individual agents work to reshape families. (4 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of an ENGL sequence