Academic Honesty Resources for Students

  • Where is the current policy and procedure located?
  • How do I avoid academic dishonesty?
    • Read your syllabus thoroughly for a clear understanding of faculty expectations
    • Ask questions if you are uncertain
    • Do your own work
    • Paraphrase and cite properly
    • Ask for help from the Center for Academic Excellence
  • What should I do if a faculty member talks to me about an academic honesty incident?
  • What are the possible sanctions?
    • Sanctions include, but are not limited to: a reduced grade for the assignment, a grade of “0” for the assignment, “F” for the course, removal from a course, Institute suspension or Institute expulsion.
       
  • What if I see a classmate violating the academic honesty policy?
    • If you see something, say something…Students who suspect another classmate of academic dishonesty can either talk directly to the Faculty member or call EthicsPoint anonymously (855-353-9143 or EthicsPoint Online: http://wit.ethicspoint.com)
       
  • What is the process that the Institute follows?
    • All academic dishonesty incidents are recorded in an Institute wide database-
      • only 1 person has access to this database to monitor and administer the policy
         
  • What are the different types of academic honesty?
    • Cheating: Cheating can be manifested in many forms, including but not limited to:
      • Copying from another student’s paper;
      • speaking to, or collaborating with, another person without permission during an exam;
      • mailing your material by computer to others;
      • allowing another student to copy from a test;
      • using materials such as calculators, notes, or books during an exam without permission;
      • tracing someone else’s drawings unless instructed to do so;
      • resubmitting a paper written for one class to a different class without permission;
      • collaborating outside of class when not permitted;
      • Posting any coursework (assignments, homework questions, exams, etc.) on websites such as (but not limited to) Chegg and Coursehero;
      • taking information from someone’s computer without permission; 
      • submitting a paper or assignment that was ghost written, in whole or in part, by another person.
      • submitting materials from a website as one’s own.
    • Fabrication: is the use of invented information or the falsification of research or other findings. Examples include but not limited to:
      • citation of information not taken from the source indicated;
      • listing sources in a bibliography, footnotes, or endnotes that are not used in the academic exercise;
      • submitting work done by another, in part or in whole, as one’s own (including materials from a website).
    • Plagiarism is the submission or inclusion of someone else’s words, drawings, ideas, or data (including that from a website) as one’s own work without giving credit to the source. When sources are used in a paper or drawing, acknowledgement of the original author or source must be made through appropriate references (footnotes, endnotes) or if directly quoted, quotation marks or indentations must be used. Even if another person’s idea, opinion, or theory is paraphrased into your own words, you can be accused of plagiarism. The same holds true for drawings. Only when information is common knowledge may a fact or statistic be used without giving credit. Plagiarism also prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of papers or other academic materials.
    • Academic Misconduct is the violation of Institute academic policies or infringement on the rights of others to receive an education. Examples include but not limited to:
      • stealing, buying or obtaining all or part of a test;
      • selling or giving away all or part of an un-administered test, including answers;
      • bribing any other person to obtain information about a test;
      • entering an office for the purpose of changing a grade in a grade book, on a test, or on other work for which a grade is given;
      • changing, altering or being an accessory to the changing/altering of a grade or any official academic record of the Institute;
      • forging any signatures or altering information on Institute forms;
      • using someone else’s work, including submission of material from a website as one’s own.
      • behavior unbecoming a student in an academic venue. Academic venues include, but are not limited to, the classroom, laboratory, studio, shops, site visits, program or department conferences, a museum and a factory.
         
  • What is the Academic Discipline Board and what is their purpose?
    • The ADB has jurisdiction over acts of alleged academic dishonesty involving the three academic colleges and the College of Professional and Continuing Education (“CPCE”). The ABD determines whether or not additional sanctions need to be imposed, in addition to the grade assigned by the faculty member because of the student’s prior history and severity of violations of academic honesty. These sanctions may include, but are not limited to, grade reduction, institute probation, suspension and expulsion from the Institute.
    • The members are appointed by the Provost and may include faculty, chairs and the deans. A dean shall serve as Chair. A panel of three to five members will hear each matter.